Affective vs. Effective | Difference & Example Sentences

Affective and effective are two adjectives that are commonly confused.

  • Affective (pronounced [af-ek-tiv]) describes something that influences or causes feelings or emotions. It can also describe how these emotions are expressed.
  • Effective (pronounced [if-ek-tiv]) instead signifies that something is having an effect (especially the effect that was hoped for).
Examples: “Affective” in a sentence Examples: “Effective” in a sentence
Her affective disorder made it difficult for her to work a standard job.

Cognitive bias can be suggested by several affective symptoms.

You’re fired, effective immediately.

The new study methods proved effective for the at-risk students.

Tip
The best approach is to bear in mind that effective is a much more commonly used word than affective. If the sentence doesn’t immediately relate to feelings or emotions, the correct word is effective.

The distinction made here is the same as that between the related nouns affect and effect—where, again, affect (as a noun) is much rarer than effect.

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All Right vs. Alright | Difference & Example Sentences

All right and alright are two spellings of the same term, an adjective, adverb, or interjection meaning the same thing as “okay.”

  • All right (with a space) is the form usually used in published writing.
  • Alright is a very common spelling in everyday communication, but it’s not always considered correct by dictionaries (though it is included in Merriam-Webster and the OED). It’s uncommon in published writing.
Examples: All right or alright in a sentence
Thankfully, Rhonda is doing all right after her cataracts surgery.

It’s the flu all right!

College is going alright so far.

Note
Regardless of how you spell it, all right/alright is considered too informal to use in academic writing. Use a more formal term like “adequate” in this context.

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Accept vs. Except | Difference & Example Sentences

Accept and except are frequently confused, but they are totally different words.

  • Accept (pronounced [ak-sept]) is a transitive verb meaning to willingly receive, allow, or approve of something or someone.
  • Except (pronounced [ek-sept] is mainly used as a preposition meaning “excluding” or “apart from.”
Examples: “Accept” in a sentence Examples: “Except” in a sentence
The changes in his personality were hard to accept.

The company really wanted her to accept their job offer.

He didn’t like any of his colleagues except Mario.

The restaurant was open every day except Monday.

Tip
One way to remember the difference between the two is to bear in mind that except begins with “ex,” just like “excluding.”

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Advisor vs. Adviser | Definition, Difference & Examples

Advisor and adviser are different spellings of the same word. Both are considered acceptable spellings, though there is some regional variation.

  • Adviser is the original and more commonly used spelling. It is sometimes considered more informal.
  • Advisor is also considered a correct spelling. It is less commonly used, but usually signifies an official position. It is more common in US English than UK English.
Examples: Adviser and Advisor in a sentence
Despite his lower station, the baron quickly became the queen’s most trusted adviser, called upon to advise her on a variety of subjects.

His vast combat experience made him a sought-after military adviser in the private sector.

Jane had worked as an academic advisor at the local college for many years and was beloved by the students.

When it became clear that liquidating the estate would be less simple than they thought, they decided to hire a financial advisor.

Note
According to the AP Stylebook, adviser is the correct spelling. But other sources such as Merriam-Webster list both spellings as equally correct, with no difference in meaning. The best approach is to pick one spelling and stick to it consistently in your writing.

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When to Use A vs. An | Difference & Example Sentences

A and an are different forms of the same word, the indefinite article that often precedes a noun.

  • A is used before a noun that starts with a consonant sound (e.g., “s,” “t,” “v”).
  • An is used before a noun that starts with a vowel sound (e.g., “a,” “o,” “i”).

Note that the rule is not whether they start with a consonant or vowel, but whether they start with a consonant or vowel sound. This can help you decide which to use in difficult cases like words beginning in “u” or “h.”

Examples: A in a sentence Examples: An in a sentence
He had a dog when he was a child.

Oranges are a good source of Vitamin C.

She had an aneurysm when she was a child.

Many employees of the company owned an iPhone.

A usurper to the throne was imminent. Following an SOP is a good way to ensure everything goes smoothly.

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How to Write a Dissertation or Thesis Proposal

When starting your thesis or dissertation process, one of the first requirements is a research proposal or a prospectus. It describes what or who you want to examine, delving into why, when, where, and how you will do so, stemming from your research question and a relevant topic.

The proposal or prospectus stage is crucial for the development of your research. It helps you choose a type of research to pursue, as well as whether to pursue qualitative or quantitative methods and what your research design will look like.

You can download our templates in the format of your choice below.

Download Word template Download Google Docs template

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How to Write Recommendations in Research | Examples & Tips

Recommendations in research are a crucial component of your discussion section and the conclusion of your thesis, dissertation, or research paper.

As you conduct your research and analyze the data you collected, perhaps there are ideas or results that don’t quite fit the scope of your research topic. Or, maybe your results suggest that there are further implications of your results or the causal relationships between previously-studied variables than covered in extant research.

Note
Recommendations are generally included both in your conclusion (briefly) and in your discussion section. However, if your research is more business-oriented or practical in nature, you can also present them in a separate chapter or advisory report.

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What Is a Thesis? | Ultimate Guide & Examples

Structure of a Thesis

A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master’s program or a capstone to a bachelor’s degree.

Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience. Other than a dissertation, it is one of the longest pieces of writing students typically complete. It relies on your ability to conduct research from start to finish: choosing a relevant topic, crafting a proposal, designing your research, collecting data, developing a robust analysis, drawing strong conclusions, and writing concisely.

Thesis template

You can also download our full thesis template in the format of your choice below. Our template includes a ready-made table of contents, as well as guidance for what each chapter should include. It’s easy to make it your own, and can help you get started.

Download Word template Download Google Docs template

Note
Many departments and/or fields of study have specific structural guidelines for theses. When in doubt, ask your supervisor.

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Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples

It can be difficult to know where to start when writing your thesis or dissertation. One way to come up with some ideas or maybe even combat writer’s block is to check out previous work done by other students on a similar thesis or dissertation topic to yours.

This article collects a list of undergraduate, master’s, and PhD theses and dissertations that have won prizes for their high-quality research.

Note
As you read the examples below, bear in mind that all universities have their own guidelines for writing theses and dissertations. The requirements for length, format, and structure often vary by faculty and department. Different disciplines have different research conventions and use different citation styles.

We highly recommend that you review your own university’s policies, and discuss any questions with your supervisor.

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Thesis & Dissertation Database Examples

During the process of writing your thesis or dissertation, it can be helpful to read those submitted by other students.

Luckily, many universities have databases where you can find out who has written about your dissertation topic previously and how they approached it. While some databases are only accessible via your university library, more and more universities are making these databases public.

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