Modelling vs. Modeling | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Modelling and modeling are two different spellings of the present participle of the verb “model” (and the identical gerund) used to mean “display by wearing or posing” or to refer to the act of creating a representation or imitation of something.

The spelling tends to vary based on whether you’re using UK or US English:

  • In UK English, “modelling” (double “l”) is standard, but “modeling” (one “l”) is acceptable.
  • In US English, “modeling” (one “l”) is correct.
Examples: Modelling and modeling in a sentence
Ariana is modelling/modeling for a new fashion company.

Modelling/modeling auditions will be held in the local theater.

Isla’s research involves computational modelling/modeling.

Modelling/modeling is a very competitive industry.

Continue reading: Modelling vs. Modeling | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

*Sence or Sense? | Meaning, Definition & Spelling

Sense is a verb meaning “feel” and a noun meaning “good judgment,” “awareness,” “vague impression,” and “particular meaning.” It can also be used to refer to one of the five sensory faculties (i.e., sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing).

People sometimes mistakenly write “sence” instead of sense, but it’s wrong and should be avoided. While some words with a similar pronunciation are spelled with a “c” (e.g., “fence”), others are always spelled with an “s” (e.g., “tense”); sense belongs to the latter group.

Examples: Sense and sence in a sentence
  • I can sence that something is wrong.
  • I can sense that something is wrong.
  • Paul has no common sence.
  • Paul has no common sense.

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: *Sence or Sense? | Meaning, Definition & Spelling

What Is a Participle? | Definition, Types & Examples

A participle is a word derived from a verb that can be used as an adjective or to form certain verb tenses. There are two main types of participles:

  • Past participles (typically ending in “-ed,” “-en,” “-n,” “-ne,” or “-t”) are used for perfect tenses and passive voice constructions.
  • Present participles (always ending in “-ing”) are used for continuous tenses.
Examples: Past participles and present participles in a sentence
Surprised by the sound of sirens, I looked out the window.

Andy cleaned up the broken glass.

I saw Kevin running down the street.

Everyone stared at the laughing man.

Note
The words “past” and “present” do not indicate the specific tenses in which participles are used. Both past participles and present participles can be used in the past, present, and future tense. And both are commonly used as adjectives.

Continue reading: What Is a Participle? | Definition, Types & Examples

*Alot vs. A Lot vs. Allot | Meaning & Correct Spelling

A lot and allot are pronounced the same, but they have unrelated meanings.

  • A lot is used as a pronoun meaning “many” or “a great amount” and an adverb meaning “very much” or “often.”
  • Allot is a verb meaning “assign” or “distribute.”
  • Alot is sometimes mistakenly used instead of a lot. However, it isn’t a real word and should be avoided.
Examples: A lot in a sentence Examples: Allot in a sentence
Javier eats a lot of fruit but not many vegetables. The president decided to allot more funding to national defense.
My cat sleeps a lot. Students should allot an hour every day to independent study.

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: *Alot vs. A Lot vs. Allot | Meaning & Correct Spelling

Is It *Now a Days or Nowadays? | Meaning & Spelling

Nowadays is an adverb meaning “at present” or “in comparison with a past time.”

“Now a days,” written with spaces, is sometimes used instead of nowadays. However, this is not correct and should be avoided. Other variants such as “now-a-days,” “now days,” “nowdays,” and “nowaday” are also wrong.

Examples: Now a days and nowadays in a sentence
  • Now a days, many people work from home.
  • Nowadays, many people work from home.
  • April used to work for a large firm, but now a days she runs a small legal practice.
  • April used to work for a large firm, but nowadays she runs a small legal practice.

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: Is It *Now a Days or Nowadays? | Meaning & Spelling

Beck and Call or *Beckon Call | Meaning & Spelling

Beck and call is part of the expression “at someone’s beck and call,” meaning “ready to do whatever someone asks.”

“Beckon call” is sometimes used instead of beck and call, but it’s incorrect and should be avoided.

Examples: Beck and call and beckon call in a sentence
  • Rose is at the beckon call of her boss.
  • Rose is at the beck and call of her boss.
  • I’m not at your beckon call.
  • I’m not at your beck and call.
Note
While the noun beck is closely related to the verb beckon, they don’t mean the same thing and can’t be used interchangeably. Beck is quite rarely used outside of this expression in modern English.

Continue reading: Beck and Call or *Beckon Call | Meaning & Spelling

Is it *Jist or Gist? | Meaning & Correct Spelling

Gist is a noun meaning “essence” or “main idea.” It’s always preceded by the definite article “the” (you can’t say “a gist”). In legal contexts, gist is used to refer to the grounds of a legal action.

“Jist” is sometimes mistakenly used instead of gist. However, “jist” is not a real word and should be avoided.

Examples: Jist and gist in a sentence
  • I got the jist of the lecture.
  • I got the gist of the lecture.
  • What is the jist of the book?
  • What is the gist of the book?

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: Is it *Jist or Gist? | Meaning & Correct Spelling

Practice vs. Practise | Definition, Difference & Examples

Practice and practise are two different spellings of the verb meaning “train by repetition” or “engage professionally in something.”

The noun is always spelled “practice.” The spelling of the verb varies based on whether you’re writing in UK or US English:

  • In UK English, “practice” (with a “c”) is the noun and “practise” (with an “s”) is the verb.
  • In US English, “practice” (with a “c”) is used as both noun and verb. “Practise” (with an “s”) is never used.
Examples: Practise and practice in a sentence
I still practise/practice speaking French, albeit not often.

If you want to be a better cook, you should practise/practice cooking more often.

Gerard’s research has major implications for clinical practice.

The medieval practice of alchemy influenced the modern field of chemistry.

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: Practice vs. Practise | Definition, Difference & Examples

Genuflect | Meaning, Definition & Examples

Genuflect (pronounced [jen-yoo-flekt]) is a verb referring to the act of briefly bending down on one knee as a sign of respect or worship (similar to kneeling). It’s a common feature of Christian religious practices and marriage proposals.

“Genuflect” is also used metaphorically to describe the behavior of someone who is overly humble or subservient.

Examples: Genuflect in a sentence
Patrick didn’t genuflect when he proposed to his fiancée.

The protagonist of the story refused to genuflect before the evil king.

I’m not someone who genuflects for powerful people. I treat everyone equally.

Try the Scribbr Grammar Checker

Continue reading: Genuflect | Meaning, Definition & Examples

Kneeled or Knelt | Meaning, Difference & Examples

Kneeled and knelt are two different spellings of the past simple and past participle of the verb “kneel,” used to refer to the act of placing one or both knees on the ground. This action is often used as a gesture of respect or worship (similar to “genuflecting”).

The spelling of the past tense varies somewhat between UK and US English:

  • In UK English, “knelt” is standard (though “kneeled” is still acceptable).
  • In US English, both “knelt” and “kneeled” are commonly used (“knelt” is more popular).
Examples: Kneeled and knelt in a sentence
The people knelt/kneeled before the queen.

The worshippers knelt/kneeled and prayed every morning.

The mother knelt/kneeled on the floor to play with the child.

Note
Verbs whose past simple and past participle are formed in some way other than by adding the suffix “-ed” are called irregular verbs.

“Kneel” can be either regular or irregular; the irregular form is more popular today, especially in UK English. Other verbs that can be either regular or irregular are “learnt/learned,” “dreamt/dreamed,” “spelt/spelled” and “burnt/burned.”

Continue reading: Kneeled or Knelt | Meaning, Difference & Examples