Good vs. Well | Difference, Definitions & Examples

Good and well are two related words that are sometimes used interchangeably, but they perform different meanings and grammatical roles.

  • Good is an adjective meaning “favorable” or “praiseworthy.”
  • Well is an adverb meaning “in a satisfactory manner.”
Examples: Good in a sentence Examples: Well in a sentence
Phil’s new car gets good mileage. Darren’s team played well, but they still lost the game.
The protagonist of the film is not believable; in reality, no one is that good. I may not be rich, but I live well.
Arianna is a good teacher, albeit a little impatient. The app functions well, but it needs some improvement.

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Regards | Meaning, Alternatives & Examples

Regards is a common sign-off in emails and other forms of correspondence. It’s used to end an email by wishing the recipient well. It’s followed by a comma, and then your name on a separate line.

While regards is an effective and respectful way to end an email, there are numerous alternatives and modified versions that can be used to vary the tone of your writing to make it more or less familiar.

Example: Regards
Dear Dr. Burke,

I am writing to inquire about …

Regards,

Nora Scott

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7 Alternatives to “I Hope This Email Finds You Well”

I hope this email finds you well is an expression commonly used at the start of formal emails to express interest in the recipient’s well-being.

This expression is polite and establishes a professional tone. However, it’s frequently used and might be perceived by some people as formulaic, insincere, or old-fashioned.

Below, we provide seven useful alternatives so you can vary how you start an email, creating polite and engaging introductions that will stand out.

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(A) Few | Definition, Uses & Examples

Few is a word meaning “not many” or “a small number of.” It’s used to refer to a nonspecific quantity of countable nouns (e.g., “few books”). Depending on how it’s used, “few” can be grammatically classified as a determiner, adjective, noun, or indefinite pronoun.

Few doesn’t refer to a specific number, and its correct use depends on context. For example, if you’re discussing something there are millions of, “few” could reasonably be used to refer to several hundred. If you’re discussing something there are forty of, “few” could be used to refer to three or four.

Examples: Few in a sentence
Very few people have been to the South Pole.

Few bank employees have access to the vault.

My coworkers and I touch base a few times each week.

The restaurant has quite a few vegetarian options.

Note
In some contexts, such as academic writing, few may be considered too vague, and you may need to use a more precise alternative.

  • Few patients reported negative side effects.
  • Three patients reported negative side effects.

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What Is a Present Participle? | Examples & Definition

A present participle is a word derived from a verb that can be used as an adjective and to form the continuous verb tenses. It is one of two types of participles, along with past participles.

The present participles of both regular and irregular verbs end in “-ing” (e.g., “traveling”).

Examples: Present participles in a sentence
Jessica found skydiving to be a terrifying experience.

Running to catch his bus, Darren tripped and fell.

I would love to go to the concert, but I’m working this weekend.

Sara has been planning a trip to Machu Picchu for the last few weeks.

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What Is a Past Participle? | Definition & Examples

A past participle is a word derived from a verb that can be used as an adjective, to form perfect verb tenses, and to form the passive voice. It is one of two types of participles, along with present participles.

  • The past participles of regular verbs are usually formed by adding the suffix “-ed” (e.g., “learn” becomes “learned”).
  • The past participles of irregular verbs have numerous endings like “-en,” “-n,” “-ne,” and “-t” (e.g., “kneel” becomes “knelt”).
Examples: Past participles in a sentence
The children played with the excited dog.

The injured cyclist was helped by a passerby.

The train will have left by the time you arrive.

I had expected more people to come to the party.

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Modelling vs. Modeling | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Modelling and modeling are two different spellings of the present participle of the verb “model” (and the identical gerund and adjective) used to mean “display by wearing or posing” or to refer to the act of creating a representation or imitation of something.

The spelling tends to vary based on whether you’re using UK or US English:

  • In UK English, “modelling” (double “l”) is standard, but “modeling” (one “l”) is acceptable.
  • In US English, “modeling” (one “l”) is correct.
Examples: Modelling and modeling in a sentence
Ariana is modelling/modeling for a new fashion company.

Modelling/modeling auditions will be held in the local theater.

Isla’s research involves computational modelling/modeling.

Modelling/modeling is a very competitive industry.

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*Sence or Sense? | Meaning, Definition & Spelling

Sense is a verb meaning “feel” and a noun meaning “good judgment,” “awareness,” “vague impression,” and “particular meaning.” It can also be used to refer to one of the five sensory faculties (i.e., sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing).

People sometimes mistakenly write “sence” instead of sense, but it’s wrong and should be avoided. While some words with a similar pronunciation are spelled with a “c” (e.g., “fence”), others are always spelled with an “s” (e.g., “tense”); sense belongs to the latter group.

Examples: Sense and sence in a sentence
  • I can sence that something is wrong.
  • I can sense that something is wrong.
  • Paul has no common sence.
  • Paul has no common sense.

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What Is a Participle? | Definition, Types & Examples

A participle is a word derived from a verb that can be used as an adjective or to form certain verb tenses. There are two main types of participles:

  • Past participles (typically ending in “-ed,” “-en,” “-n,” “-ne,” or “-t”) are used for perfect tenses and passive voice constructions.
  • Present participles (always ending in “-ing”) are used for continuous tenses.
Examples: Past participles and present participles in a sentence
Surprised by the sound of sirens, I looked out the window.

Andy cleaned up the broken glass.

I saw Kevin running down the street.

Everyone stared at the laughing man.

Note
The words “past” and “present” do not indicate the specific tenses in which participles are used. Both past participles and present participles can be used in the past, present, and future tense. And both are commonly used as adjectives.

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*Alot vs. A Lot vs. Allot | Meaning & Correct Spelling

A lot and allot are pronounced the same, but they have unrelated meanings.

  • A lot is used as a pronoun meaning “many” or “a great amount” and an adverb meaning “very much” or “often.”
  • Allot is a verb meaning “assign” or “distribute.”
  • Alot is sometimes mistakenly used instead of a lot. However, it isn’t a real word and should be avoided.
Examples: A lot in a sentence Examples: Allot in a sentence
Javier eats a lot of fruit but not many vegetables. The president decided to allot more funding to national defense.
My cat sleeps a lot. Students should allot an hour every day to independent study.

Continue reading: *Alot vs. A Lot vs. Allot | Meaning & Correct Spelling