What Does Implications Mean? | Definition & Examples

Implication is a noun that refers to the act of implying (i.e., suggesting something without explicitly stating it) and to something that is implied or suggested. It’s also used to refer to the act of implicating (i.e., proving someone’s involvement in a crime) and to the state of being implicated.

Implications is often used in academic writing to refer to the possible impact and influence of a study or to what conclusions can be drawn from a particular result.

Examples: Implication in a sentence
The lecturer made the implication that science was subjective.

The implications of this study for further research are discussed in the final chapter.

I resent the implication that my comment was facetious!

Clare’s implication in the crime was based on circumstantial evidence.

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Aid vs. Aide | Definition, Difference & Examples

Aid and aide are pronounced the same but have different meanings.

  • Aid can be used as a verb meaning “help” or “assist” and as a noun meaning “assistance” or “relief.”
  • Aide is a noun meaning “assistant.”
Examples: Aid in a sentence Examples: Aide in a sentence
I will aid you in any way I can with my advice. Janet works as a presidential aide in the Capitol.
Due to the recession, the country is in extreme need of financial aid. Mike is training to become a nurse aide because he wants to help people.
Without military aid, we will lose the war. Most of Tom’s work is actually done by his aide.

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Adverbial Phrases (& Clauses) | Definition & Examples

An adverbial phrase is a group of words that acts like an adverb—i.e., it modifies a verb, adjective, adverb, or even a whole clause.

Like adverbs, adverbial phrases can be used to describe how (e.g., “with sadness”), where (e.g., “behind the bookshelf”), when (e.g., “in the morning”), and why (e.g., “to buy groceries”).

Adverbial clauses are similar to adverbial phrases. However, unlike adverbial phrases, adverbial clauses always have a subject and verb (e.g., “when you visit”).

Examples: Adverbial phrases and adverbial clauses in a sentence
Jamil has a meeting at noon.

Samantha went to her friend’s house to watch a film.

Before we begin, I would like to make an announcement.

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What Is an Adverb? Definition, Types & Examples

An adverb is a word that can modify or describe a verb, adjective, another adverb, or entire sentence. Adverbs can be used to show manner (how something happens), degree (to what extent), place (where), and time (when).

Adverbs are usually formed by adding -ly to the end of an adjective (e.g., “quick” becomes “quickly”), although there are also other adverbs that don’t have this ending. There are also adverbial phrases, series of words that play the grammatical role of adverbs.

Examples: Adverbs in a sentence
Ali walked quickly.

Charlize never answers her phone.

It is an incredibly exciting film.

Actually, I’m not sure.

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Alike | Definition, Meaning & Examples

Alike is an adjective meaning “similar” and an adverb meaning “in a similar way.” The meaning of the word can vary in degree depending on the context—from saying two things are exactly the same to saying that they merely have something in common.

Examples: “Alike” in a sentence
The two political opponents are actually alike in their views.

The twins seem to always dress alike.

The father and son are somewhat alike, but the father is more patient.

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Who vs. Whom | Examples, Definition & Quiz

Who and whom are both pronouns used to refer to people, but they have different grammatical functions.

  • Who is a pronoun that functions as the subject of a sentence or clause (i.e., the person performing the action).
  • Whom is a pronoun that functions as the object of a verb or preposition (i.e., the person that is acted upon).

Who and whom are used to refer to people and sometimes animals.

Examples: Who in a sentence Examples: Whom in a sentence
Who is at the door? To whom should I speak?
Who knows the answer? With whom do you want to work?
Jamil, who just started last week, is already excelling at his new job. Fia, whom I have known for years, is getting married next week.
Note
Whom is considered very formal and is often replaced with who in informal contexts. For example, “To whom should I speak?” would more typically be phrased “Who should I speak to?”

However, it’s important to use “who” and “whom” correctly in formal and academic writing.

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What Is an Interjection? | Examples, Definition & Types

An interjection is a word or phrase used to express a feeling or to request or demand something. While interjections are a part of speech, they are not grammatically connected to other parts of a sentence.

Interjections are common in everyday speech and informal writing. While some interjections such as “well” and “indeed” are acceptable in formal conversation, it’s best to avoid interjections in formal or academic writing.

Examples: Interjections in a sentence
Wow! That bird is huge.

Uh-oh. I forgot to get gas.

We’re not lost. We just need to go, um, this way.

Psst, what’s the answer to number four?

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Burned or Burnt | Meaning, Difference & Examples

Burned and burnt are two different spellings of the past tense of the verb “burn,” used to refer to the act of undergoing combustion and the act of injuring someone or damaging something by heat or fire.

The spelling tends to vary based on whether you’re using UK or US English:

  • In UK English, both “burned” and “burnt” are commonly used for both the verb and adjective sense of the word.
  • In US English, “burned” is standard as a verb, but both “burned” and “burnt” can be used as adjectives.
Examples: “Burned” and “burnt” in a sentence
Shawna burnt/burned her hand on the stove.

Gina forgot to turn the oven off, so the chicken was burnt/burned.

The fire burnt/burned all night and kept the room warm.

Luckily, I remembered to blow out the candles; otherwise, the house might have burnt/burned down.

Note
Verbs that form their past tense in some way other than by adding the suffix “-ed” are called irregular verbs. “Burn” can be either regular or irregular, with the irregular form more commonly used in UK English. This is also true of “learnt/learned” and “dreamt/dreamed.”

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Theatre vs. Theater | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Theatre and theater are two different spellings of the noun used to refer to the building in which theatrical performances are carried out and to the art or profession of theatrical production. The spelling varies based on whether you’re writing UK or US English.

  • In UK English, “theatre” is standard.
  • In US English, “theater” is more common.
Examples: Theatre and theater in a sentence
The local theatre/theater has received national funding.

Whenever I visit London, I go to the theatre/theater.

Eva has always wanted to work in the theatre/theater.

I’m not a fan of the theatre/theater. I prefer watching movies.

Note
Sometimes a distinction is made between theater (meaning a building) and theatre (meaning the art or business of theatrical production). However, this distinction is not commonly accepted and does not reflect actual usage.

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For All Intents and Purposes | Meaning & Examples

For all intents and purposes is an expression meaning “essentially” or “in effect.” It’s used to say that something has the same outcome or result as something else.

Examples: For all intents and purposes in a sentence
For all intents and purposes, this is an introductory course.

The warring sides had, for all intents and purposes, agreed to a ceasefire.

The old laptop is, for all intents and purposes, useless.

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