Spelt or Spelled | Meaning, Difference & Examples

Spelt and spelled are two different spellings of the past tense of the verb “spell,” used to refer to the act of writing or saying letters in a specific order to form a word.

The spelling tends to vary based on whether you’re using UK or US English:

  • In UK English, both “spelled” and “spelt” are commonly used.
  • In US English, “spelled” is standard, and “spelt” is generally not accepted.
Examples: Spelt and spelled in a sentence
My name can be spelt/spelled many different ways.

The child spelt/spelled the word for the teacher.

The two dictionaries spelt/spelled the word differently.

I’d heard someone talk about Scribbr, but I wasn’t sure how it was spelt/spelled.

Note
Verbs whose simple past and past participles are formed in some way other than by adding the suffix “-ed” are called irregular verbs.

“Spell” can be either regular or irregular, with the irregular form more common in UK English. This is also true of “learnt/learned,” “dreamt/dreamed,” “knelt/kneeled,” and “burnt/burned.”

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Is It Forty or *Fourty? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Forty (40) is a cardinal number (i.e., a number used to indicate quantity). Like other words for numbers, it can be grammatically classified as a determiner, adjective, noun, or pronoun.

“Fourty” is sometimes used instead of forty, but this is incorrect. Although “four” is the correct spelling of 4, “fourty” is not a real word and should be avoided. The same applies when forty is used as part of a larger number (e.g., “forty-four,” “one-hundred-forty”).

Examples: Forty and fourty in a sentence
  • The train was delayed by fourty minutes.
  • The train was delayed by forty minutes.
  • Fourty is divisible by four.
  • Forty is divisible by four.

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Is *Irregardless a Word? | Definition & Spelling

Regardless is an adverb meaning “despite everything.” It’s often used as a transition word at the start of a sentence to change the topic.

“Irregardless” is sometimes used instead of regardless. However, most dictionaries don’t consider “irregardless” a real word, and it should be avoided in formal or academic writing.

Examples: Irregardless and regardless in a sentence
  • I might lose, but I’m going to try irregardless.
  • I might lose, but I’m going to try regardless.
  • Irregardless, you should come to the party.
  • Regardless, you should come to the party.

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Is It Whoa or *Woah? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Whoa is an interjection traditionally used to command a horse (and sometimes a person) to slow down or stop. It can also be used to express surprise or shock. As an interjection, whoa is not used in formal or academic writing.

“Woah” is more popular in UK English than US English, but it’s not considered an accepted variant of whoa by many dictionaries. In US English, “woah” is still always considered nonstandard.

Examples: Woah and whoa in a sentence
  • Woah! Slow down
  • Whoa! Slow down.
  • Woah! I wasn’t expecting that.
  • Whoa! I wasn’t expecting that.

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*Truely or Truly | Correct Spelling & Meaning

Truly is an adverb meaning “in a truthful way,” “absolutely,” or “properly.” It’s the adverbial form of the adjective “true.”

“Truely” is sometimes mistakenly used instead of truly, but “truely” is not a real word and should be avoided.

Examples: Truely and truly in a sentence
  • Kala is a truely talented actor.
  • Kala is a truly talented actor.
  • The band’s performance was truely awful.
  • The band’s performance was truly awful.
    Note
    Adverbs are often formed by adding “-ly” to the end of an adjective. While some adverbs ending with the letter “e” receive the suffix without dropping the “e” (e.g., “nice” becomes “nicely”), others, like “true,” do not.

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    Labelled or Labeled | Difference & Examples

    Labelled and labeled are two different spellings of the past tense of the verblabel,” referring to the act of attaching a label or identifying marker to something. The verb is also used negatively to refer to the act of assigning someone or something to a specific category.

    The spelling tends to vary based on whether you’re using UK or US English:

    • In US English, “labeled” (one “l”) is standard.
    • In UK English, “labelled” (double “l”) is correct.
    Examples: Labeled and labelled in a sentence
    Many items were labeled/labelled incorrectly.

    Even though the two politicians labeled/labelled each other dangerous, they were quite alike in their beliefs.

    All of Niamh’s files were meticulously labeled/labelled.

    When you’ve labeled/labelled the new products, please put them on the shelves.

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    *Lable or Label | Correct Spelling & Meaning

    Label is a noun referring to a piece of material that identifies or describes an object it’s affixed to. It’s also used as a verb to refer to the act of attaching a label to something or, more negatively, to refer to the act of assigning someone to a specific category.

    “Lable” is sometimes used instead of label, but this is incorrect. “Lable” is not a real word and should be avoided.

    Examples: Label and lable in a sentence
    • Sara read the lable on the sweater.
    • Sara read the label on the sweater.
    • You shouldn’t lable people based on their religious beliefs.
    • You shouldn’t label people based on their religious beliefs.

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    Undoubtedly | Meaning, Definition & Examples

    Undoubtedly is an adverb meaning “without doubt” or “certainly.” It’s a somewhat less formal alternative to “indubitably.”

    It can be used at the beginning, middle, or end of a sentence to express a viewpoint or evaluation. It can also be used by itself in response to a question, or as a sentence adverb modifying the whole sentence.

    Examples: Undoubtedly in a sentence
    This is undoubtedly the best dessert I’ve ever eaten.

    Undoubtedly, there’s going to be a storm.

    Undoubtedly!

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    Anymore vs. Any More | Difference, Examples & Quiz

    Anymore and any more are pronounced the same but have different meanings.

    • Anymore (one word) is an adverb meaning “any longer” or “to any further extent.”
    • Any more (two words) is a determiner used to refer to quantities.
    Examples: Anymore in a sentence Examples: Any more in a sentence
    Jamie used to live here, but he doesn’t anymore. I’m not giving you any more money.
    Liam broke his foot, so he can’t play football anymore. Do we have any more fruit?
    Note
    In UK English, anymore (one word) is typically considered incorrect, and any more (two words) is used as both an adverb and a determiner.

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    Blond vs. Blonde | Difference & Example Sentences

    Blond and blonde are two forms of the same word. They’re pronounced the same but can have slightly different meanings, depending on how they are used.

    • Blond is a noun traditionally used to refer to a man with golden or pale yellow hair. It can also be used as an adjective to describe something (typically a man’s hair) as “golden” or “pale yellow.”
    • Blonde is a noun traditionally used to refer to a woman with golden or pale yellow hair. It can also be used as an adjective to describe something (typically a woman’s hair) as “golden” or “pale yellow.”
    Examples: Blond in a sentence Examples: Blonde in a sentence
    Jake gets sunburned easily because he is a blond. My mother is a natural blonde, but she dyes her hair.
    When Andreas was a child, he had blond hair. Christine wants to get blonde highlights.
    Patrick has dark hair but blond eyebrows. The girl who called for you had blonde hair.
    Note
    This article describes the words as they are traditionally used, but different style guides offer contradictory advice on this issue. Some advise against the use of gendered language, while others retain the traditional spelling distinction. In popular usage, the words are often used interchangeably.

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