How to cite a newspaper article in Chicago style

To cite a newspaper or magazine article in Chicago, you can use a footnote citation:

1. Gibbons-Neff, Thomas, and Mujib Mashal, “U.S. Is Quietly Reducing Its Troop Force in Afghanistan,” New York Times, October 21, 2019, https://nyti.ms/31xXNQb.

Chicago also allows you to cite newspaper articles informally within the text:

On October 21, 2019, the New York Times reported that the United States military was already in the process of withdrawing from Afghanistan “despite the lack of a peace deal with the Taliban” (“U.S. Is Quietly Reducing Its Troop Force in Afghanistan”).

In this case, you don’t need to include the source in your bibliography or reference list.

If you are required to formally cite newspaper articles, follow the relevant Chicago citation format: either notes and bibliography or author-date style.

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How to cite lectures and speeches in Chicago style

To cite a lecture, speech or talk in Chicago style, you’ll need the name of the lecturer; the title of the talk; details of the course, event or institution that hosted it; and the date on which it took place.

In a Chicago style bibliography, a typical lecture citation looks something like this:

Jones, David. “The Causes and Consequences of the Spanish Civil War.” Lecture, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, July 15, 2011.

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How to cite a journal article in Chicago style

To cite a journal article in a Chicago footnote or bibliography entry, the format looks like this:

Full note formatAuthor first name last name, “Article Title,” Journal Name Volume, no. Issue (Year): page number(s), DOI/URL.
Short note formatAuthor last name, “Shortened Article Title“, page number(s).
Bibliography formatAuthor last name, first name.Article Title.” Journal Name Volume, no. Issue (Month Year): Page range. DOI/URL.

If you’re using author-date style, a slightly different format applies.

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Citing sources in Chicago author-date style

The Chicago Manual of Style provides guidelines for two styles of source citation: notes and bibliography and author-date. Author-date style is the preferred option in the sciences and social sciences.

In author-date style, an in-text citation consists of the author’s name, the publication year, and (if relevant) a page number. Each citation must correspond to an entry in the reference list at the end of your paper, where you give full details of the source.

Chicago author-date style
In-text citation(McGuire 2016, 22)
Reference list entryMcGuire, Ian. 2016. The North Water. London: Simon & Schuster.

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How to cite an interview in Chicago style

To cite an interview in Chicago style, the format depends on whether you are citing a published/broadcast interview or an unpublished interview (for example, one that you conducted yourself).

A published interview is usually cited much like any other item in a periodical, but starts with the interviewee’s name in place of the author. A Chicago style footnote for a published interview looks like this:

1. J.M. Coetzee, “Writers’ Groups: An Interview with J.M. Coetzee,” interview by Peter McDonald, Writers and Free Expression (blog), January 7, 2019, https://writersandfreeexpression.com/­2019/01/07/­writers-groups-an-interview-with-j-m-coetzee/.

An unpublished interview is generally just described in the text or in a note, not included in the bibliography, and is more flexible in format:

2. David Wilson (editor at Daily Times), in discussion with the author, January 2004.

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How to cite a YouTube video in Turabian/Chicago style

The Chicago Manual of Style does not provide specific guidelines on how to cite YouTube. Turabian style, a version of Chicago designed for students and researchers, provides more detailed and practical advice on citing from YouTube and other online video sources.

A typical bibliography entry for a YouTube video in Turabian style looks like this:

Wall Street Journal. “How Hong Kong Protesters Evade Surveillance With Tech.” September 16, 2019. Video, 6:46. https://youtu.be/32KTKXZZ-BI.

Chicago/Turabian has two systems of in-text citation: you can use footnotes to cite sources, or you can provide author-date citations in the text. Choose one style and stick to it consistently.

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How to create an annotated bibliography in Turabian/Chicago Style

While a standard Chicago style bibliography provides publication details of your sources, an annotated bibliography also provides a summary (and often an evaluation) of each source.

Turabian style, a version of Chicago style specifically designed for students and researchers, provides formatting guidelines for an annotated bibliography. A typical entry might look like this:

Kenny, Anthony. A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2010.

Broad history of Western philosophy from the ancient Greeks to the present day. Divided into four periods—ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern—each section begins with a chronological overview of the key thinkers, followed by chapters dedicated to each significant subfield in the period: metaphysics, political philosophy, God, etc. Kenny generally provides thorough and fair assessments of the major philosophers’ work, but is pointedly dismissive of Derrida and other critical theorists, significantly weakening the book’s coverage of “postmodern” philosophy.

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How to cite a website in Chicago style

To cite a website in Chicago style, follow these formats for your footnotes and bibliography entries:

Full note1. Author first name last name, “Page Title,” Website Name, Month Day, Year, URL.
Short note2. Author last name, “Shortened Page Title.”
BibliographyAuthor last name, first name. “Page Title.” Website Name. Month Day, Year. URL.

There are different formats for online articles or blog posts and for social media posts.

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How to create a title page in Turabian/Chicago style

Turabian style, a version of Chicago style designed specifically for writing research papers, theses and dissertations, provides detailed guidelines for formatting a title page.

A title page is not mandatory; if you haven’t been told to include one, you can just center your title at the top of the first page.

These are the key guidelines for creating a title page in Turabian/Chicago style:

  • Title and subtitle appear ⅓ of the way down the page.
  • Other information (e.g. your name, the date, class information) appears ⅔ down the page.
  • All text is center-aligned and double-spaced.
  • No page number is included on the title page.

Note that any specific guidelines given to you by your instructor or faculty overrule the guidelines presented here.

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How to cite a book in Chicago style

The basic formats for citing a book in a Chicago footnote and a bibliography entry are as follows:

Full note formatAuthor first name last name, Book Title: Subtitle (Place of publication: Publisher, Year), page number(s).
Short note formatAuthor last name, Shortened Book Title, page number(s).
Bibliography formatAuthor last name, first name. Book Title: Subtitle. Place of publication: Publisher, Year.
Full note example1. Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (London: Penguin, 1997), 34.
Short note example2. Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, 54–55.
Bibliography exampleRhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. London: Penguin, 1997.

 

Short notes always follow the same format. Full notes and bibliography entries contain additional information if the book specifies an edition, translator or editor, and follow a specific format when citing an individual chapter in a book.

Note that book citations look slightly different in Chicago author-date style.

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