Bear in Mind | Meaning & Example Sentences

Bear in mind is a phrasal verb meaning “remember” or “consider.” It’s most commonly used in the imperative mood (i.e., as a command or instruction), to remind or warn someone of something.

It’s usually followed by the conjunction “that” and then a phrase describing the thing that should be remembered. It may instead take a direct object, in which case the object normally appears after the word “bear,” and there’s no “that” phrase afterward.

Examples: Bear in mind in a sentence
Bear in mind that these figures are only estimates.

If you bear in mind that a bad grade isn’t the end of the world, you’ll feel less anxious about the exam.

We aim to bear this principle in mind at all times.

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Research Paper Format | APA, MLA, & Chicago Templates

The formatting of a research paper is different depending on which style guide you’re following. In addition to citations, APA, MLA, and Chicago provide format guidelines for things like font choices, page layout, format of headings and the format of the reference page.

Scribbr offers free Microsoft Word templates for the most common formats. Simply download and get started on your paper.

APAMLA | Chicago author-date | Chicago notes & bibliography

Tip
If you struggle with the format of your paper, you could use Scribbr’s APA Paper Formatting service or Customized Formatting service. Our formatting experts can:

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Writing a Research Paper Conclusion | Step-by-Step Guide

The conclusion of a research paper is where you wrap up your ideas and leave the reader with a strong final impression. It has several key goals:

  • Restate the problem statement addressed in the paper
  • Summarize your overall arguments or findings
  • Suggest the key takeaways from your paper

Research paper conclusion

The content of the conclusion varies depending on whether your paper presents the results of original empirical research or constructs an argument through engagement with sources.

The steps below show you how to construct an effective conclusion for either type of research paper.

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Second-Person Pronouns | List, Examples & Explanation

Second-Person Pronouns

Second-person pronouns are words like “you” that refer to the person or people being spoken or written to. Like first- and third-person pronouns, they are a type of personal pronoun.

The second person is used frequently in everyday speech and even in some formal speech and writing, but it should be avoided in academic writing.

Second-person pronouns vary less in form than other kinds of personal pronouns. You can see all the forms in the table below, with more detailed explanation in the following sections.

Subject Object Possessive Reflexive
Singular you yours yourself
Plural you yours yourselves

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What Is a Pronoun? | Definition, Types & Examples

A pronoun is a word that stands in for a noun, often to avoid the need to repeat the same noun over and over. Like nouns, pronouns can refer to people, things, concepts, and places. Most sentences contain at least one noun or pronoun.

People tend to use “pronouns” to mean personal pronouns specifically, but there are many other kinds of pronouns that are just as important to English grammar. The words highlighted in bold below are all pronouns.

Examples: Pronouns
I asked her if the headphones were hers, but she said they belonged to someone else.

It might rain tomorrow, but there isn’t much we can do about that.

These are the days that I like best.

Which of them do you prefer? Help yourself to whichever you like.

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First-Person Pronouns | List, Examples & Explanation

First-Person Pronouns

First-person pronouns are words such as “I” and “us” that refer either to the person who said or wrote them (singular), or to a group including the speaker or writer (plural). Like second- and third-person pronouns, they are a type of personal pronoun.

They’re used without any issue in everyday speech and writing, but there’s an ongoing debate about whether they should be used in academic writing.

There are four types of first-person pronouns—subject, object, possessive, and reflexive—each of which has a singular and a plural form. They’re shown in the table below and explained in more detail in the following sections.

English first-person pronouns
Subject Object Possessive Reflexive
Singular I me mine myself
Plural we us ours ourselves

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Personal Pronouns | Definition, List & Examples

Personal pronouns are words like “you” that refer to the person speaking or writing, to the person they’re addressing, or to other people and things.

Like other pronouns, they are used in place of nouns to allow us to speak and write more concisely. For example, without the first-person pronoun “I,” you would have to use your name every time you wanted to make a statement about yourself.

Personal pronouns change form based on person, number, gender, and case, as shown in the table below, which you can also download.

Personal pronouns table

Download this table

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Writing a Research Paper Introduction | Step-by-Step Guide

Writing a Research Paper Introduction

The introduction to a research paper is where you set up your topic and approach for the reader. It has several key goals:

  • Present your topic and get the reader interested
  • Provide background or summarize existing research
  • Position your own approach
  • Detail your specific research problem and problem statement
  • Give an overview of the paper’s structure

The introduction looks slightly different depending on whether your paper presents the results of original empirical research or constructs an argument by engaging with a variety of sources.

The five steps in this article will help you put together an effective introduction for either type of research paper.

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AMA Book Citation | Guide with Examples

To cite a book in AMA citation format, include it on your AMA reference page, listing the author or editor, title, publisher, and publication year.

An AMA in-text citation for a book consists of the number of the relevant reference, written in superscript. You can also add a page number or range in parentheses if you need to cite a specific part of the book. Make sure to pay attention to punctuation (e.g., commas, quotation marks) in your citations.

AMA format Author last name Initials. Book Title: Subtitle. Publisher; Year.
AMA reference Nagel D. Needless Suffering: How Society Fails Those with Chronic Pain. University Press of New England; 2016.
AMA in-text citation Nagel1(p237) argues that pain medication can …

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AMA Journal Citation | Guide with Examples

To cite a journal article in AMA citation format, you need an AMA reference listing the author’s name, article title (in sentence case), journal name (title case, italicized, and abbreviated), publication year, volume, issue, page range of the article, and DOI if available.

An AMA in-text citation for a journal article consists of the number of the relevant reference, written in superscript. You can also add page numbers in parentheses if you need to refer to a specific part of the article.

AMA format Author last name Initials. Article title. Journal Name. Year;Volume(Issue):Page range. DOI or URL.
AMA reference Aponte J, Nokes KM. Electronic health literacy of older Hispanics with diabetes. Health Promot Int. 2017;32(3):482–489. doi:1093/heapro/dav112.
AMA in-text citation Aponte and Nokes1(p485) indicate that …
Note
Even when you access a journal article online, you should follow the format described here to cite it, not the format for an AMA website citation.

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