How to cite a newspaper article in Chicago style

In Chicago notes and bibliography style, it’s recommended to just cite newspaper articles in footnotes and omit them from the bibliography. Only list an article in the bibliography if it’s essential to your argument, if you cite it frequently, or if your university requires you to.

No page numbers are used in notes or bibliography entries for newspaper articles. Add a URL if you consulted the article online.

Chicago newspaper article citation
Bibliography Author last name, First name. “Article Title.” Newspaper Name, Month Day, YearURL.

Gibbons-Neff, Thomas, and Mujib Mashal. “U.S. Is Quietly Reducing Its Troop Force in Afghanistan.” New York Times, October 21, 2019. https://nyti.ms/31xXNQb.

Full note Author first name Last name, “Article Title,” Newspaper Name, Month Day, Year, URL.

1. Thomas Gibbons-Neff and Mujib Mashal, “U.S. Is Quietly Reducing Its Troop Force in Afghanistan,” New York Times, October 21, 2019, https://nyti.ms/31xXNQb.

Short note Author last name, “Shortened Article Title.”

2. Gibbons-Neff and Mashal, “U.S. Reducing Troop Force.”

In author-date style, however, you should always include any newspaper articles you cite in your reference list.

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How to cite a book in Chicago style

The basic formats for citing a book in a Chicago footnote and a bibliography entry are as follows:

Chicago book citation
Bibliography Author last name, first name. Book Title: Subtitle. Place of publication: Publisher, Year.

Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. London: Penguin, 1997.

Full note Author first name last name, Book Title: Subtitle (Place of publication: Publisher, Year), Page number(s).

1. Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (London: Penguin, 1997), 34.

Short note Author last name, Shortened Book Title, Page number(s).

2. Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, 54–55.

Short notes always follow the same basic format. Full notes and bibliography entries contain additional information if the book specifies an edition, translator, or editor, and follow a specific format when citing an individual chapter in a book.

Note that book citations look slightly different in Chicago author-date style.

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How to cite a journal article in Chicago style

To cite an online journal article in Chicago notes and bibliography style, list the author’s name, the title of the article, the journal name, volume, issue, and publication date, the page range on which the article appears, and a DOI or URL.

For an article accessed in print, follow the same format and simply omit the DOI or URL.

Chicago journal article citation
Bibliography Author last name, First name. “Article Title.” Journal Name Volume, no. Issue (Month or Season Year): Page range. DOI or URL.

Pickard, Hanna. “What Is Personality Disorder?” Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 18, no. 3 (September 2011): 181–84. https://doi.org/10.1353/ppp.2011.0040.

Full note Author first name Last name, “Article Title,” Journal Name Volume, no. Issue (Month or Season Year): Page number(s). DOI or URL.

1. Hanna Pickard, “What Is Personality Disorder?” Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 18, no. 3 (September 2011): 182. https://doi.org/10.1353/ppp.2011.0040.

Short note Author last name, “Shortened Title,” Page number(s).

2. Pickard, “What Is Personality Disorder?” 182.

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Citation examples for common sources types

The most common citation styles are APA and MLA. To cite a source in these styles, you need a brief in-text citation and a full reference.

Use the interactive tool to understand how a citation is structured and see examples for common source types.

As well as switching between styles and sources, you can explore how a citation looks when there are multiple authors, different editions, no publication date, and other common scenarios.

If you’re still not sure how to cite your source correctly, dive into our comprehensive articles. For each source type, we provide a range of examples in APA, MLA, and Chicago Style.

How to cite an image in Chicago style

In Chicago style, it’s acceptable to just include information about images in the text, rather than writing a formal citation.

Informal image citation
Goya painted The Drowning Dog directly onto a wall in his house some time between 1820 and 1823. The painting depicts . . .

If you’re required to include a formal citation, you can follow the format shown below to cite images found online in notes and bibliography style. Make sure to cite the page where the image is hosted, not, for example, the Google search results where you found it.

Format Author last name, First name. Image Title. Month Day, Year. Format description. Website Name. URL.
Bibliography entry Cheng, Minder. Double-Crested Cormorant. March 21, 2021. Photograph. Flickr. https://flic.kr/p/2kQcKZ3.
Footnote 1. Cheng, Double-Crested Cormorant.

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How to cite an interview

To cite a published interview from a newspaper, you need an in-text citation and a corresponding reference listing the interviewer’s name, the publication date, the interview title, the name of the newspaper, and a URL if the article was consulted online.

The exact format varies across the different citation styles: APA, MLA, and Chicago style.

When referring to an interview you conducted yourself as part of your research, you generally don’t need to include a formal citation.

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How to cite a newspaper article

To cite an article from a newspaper, you need an in-text citation and a reference listing the author, the publication date, the article’s title, the name of the newspaper, and a URL if it was accessed online.

Different citation styles present this information differently. The main styles are APA, MLA, and Chicago style.

You can explore the format for newspaper article citations in APA and MLA style using the the interactive example generator below.

Note that the format is slightly different when citing an interview published in a newspaper.

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How to cite an image

To cite an image, you need an in-text citation and a corresponding reference. The reference should list the creator of the image, the year it was published, its title and format, and its location or container (e.g. a website, book, or museum).

The format varies depending on where you accessed the image and which citation style you’re using: APA, MLA, or Chicago.

If you include the image directly in your text as a figure, you’ll usually have to include an appropriate copyright/permissions statement.

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How to cite a lecture

To cite a lecture or speech, you need an in-text citation and a corresponding reference listing the speaker, the title of the lecture, the date it took place, and details of the context (e.g. the name of the course or event and the institution).

The exact information included varies depending on how you viewed the lecture and what citation style you are using. The main citation styles are APA, MLA, and Chicago style.

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How to cite a YouTube video

To cite a video from YouTube or another video sharing site, you need an in-text citation with a corresponding reference listing the uploader, the publication date, the video title, and the URL.

The format varies depending on the citation style you use. The most common styles are APA, MLA, and Chicago style.

Use the interactive example generator below to explore the APA and MLA formats.

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